click tracking
Jump to content
Billa

Guidance on adjunct practices to Light work

Recommended Posts

Hello. :)
So its been a little over an year that I have been on LU and doing light work with Jeff and Tom. Previously before that I was more focused on the heart center and was stuck in 'receptive' mode as they say. I was doing some basic qigong and breathing practices at the time to keep myself afloat.

Now, I have become more mentally centered or rather I notice that issues arise at the level of the mind. I have also been out of touch with regular 'bottom-up' practices like qigong/yoga which would've previously helped me move the energy and relax. Ofcourse I understand that I am clearing issues on a different level now, so how these practices work on the mind-body unit changes. I have noticed at times, my breathing becomes difficult with qigong practices especially when I am holding on to issues. My question is, what practices helped you guys out or assisted you on your journey?
Like aside from dropping issues and letting go of attachments on the mind level, which practices were a good adjunct to the usual light work in clearing of issues and become more centered in the body or rather quiet the mind.


Thanks! I hope I haven't muddled the question too much.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s my experience that you cannot add things to help let go of things. In a way, there is nothing that needs to be done or new practices that would help.  It’s more the mindset of “I need to do more of this...” that must be let go of. 

 

I struggle with this, too. It’s not an easy thing. But the moments in which I feel the most clear, free and expansive is when I am not trying to do anything, I’m just aware and open, in the moment.  Our true nature is already here, now. 

 

I practice yoga and tai chi to help myself be healthy and aware of my body. But it’s easy to fall into the thoughts of “I’m  achieving some spiritual goal with the practices”, when in reality I am just creating some additional thing I need to do to reach a certain state of mind.

 

Dzogchen is good at teaching us that whatever state of mind we are in (even if that’s caught up and confused) is still our natural state, and there’s nothing that needs to be done to fix or medicate it. Simply by accepting this, allows us to come back to our center. 

 

Anyways, I hope I’m not a total buzzkill with my post. It’s something I struggle with too.  It’s ok to do new practices, but important I think to know they won’t bring us anywhere closer to ourselves - we are already here. :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To follow up with something actually useful:

 

My tai chi teacher once told me “Momentum is the antithesis of mindfulness”

 

I always will try to slow down in life, move more purposefully, with awareness. It’s a fun exercise. Try doing your everyday activities slow, and fully present. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/31/2019 at 7:31 AM, Billa said:

Hello. :)
So its been a little over an year that I have been on LU and doing light work with Jeff and Tom. Previously before that I was more focused on the heart center and was stuck in 'receptive' mode as they say. I was doing some basic qigong and breathing practices at the time to keep myself afloat.

Now, I have become more mentally centered or rather I notice that issues arise at the level of the mind. I have also been out of touch with regular 'bottom-up' practices like qigong/yoga which would've previously helped me move the energy and relax. Ofcourse I understand that I am clearing issues on a different level now, so how these practices work on the mind-body unit changes. I have noticed at times, my breathing becomes difficult with qigong practices especially when I am holding on to issues. My question is, what practices helped you guys out or assisted you on your journey?
Like aside from dropping issues and letting go of attachments on the mind level, which practices were a good adjunct to the usual light work in clearing of issues and become more centered in the body or rather quiet the mind.


Thanks! I hope I haven't muddled the question too much.
 

 

Hi Billa,

 

I think you will different answers depending on the tradition that one practiced before going light. Or you could say what they found to help them.

 

I am a big believer in practices until they are not needed anymore so here are my recommendations.

 

For meditation I really like the stages in this Bodhicitta meditation up to resting in awareness. Now as you get better you don't have to do all of the stages. I use to start with the breath meditation and then go straight to resting in awareness. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OEjEeki_Ms&list=PL-lBG3xYrkI5IA1dpluUusr6Rmgmdyyln&index=2&t=0s

 

Next is a very good energy practice. I think they are very important in speeding up the purification process and helping to make meditation deeper.

 

https://community.livingunbound.net/index.php?/topic/349-primordial-foundation-energy-practice-internal-fire/&tab=comments#comment-1499

 

Lastly is taking the practice into daily life. Learning how to reside in the energy, to let go into the energy of the upsets that are a part of our everyday interaction.

 

https://community.livingunbound.net/index.php?/topic/472-working-with-emotions/&tab=comments#comment-3445

 

This for me was a solid practice.

 

5-15 minutes of Internal Fire

Followed by

15-20 minutes of meditation

Lay down and rest for 5 minutes after meditation.

 

I did 5 minutes of Internal fire and the 20 minutes of meditation. Please feel free to change it up the times as you feel the need.

 

Twice daily, I would do it first thing when I woke up in the morning and then again either when I got home from work or right before bed.

 

Hope that helps.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/31/2019 at 10:56 AM, FaXin said:

It’s my experience that you cannot add things to help let go of things. In a way, there is nothing that needs to be done or new practices that would help.  It’s more the mindset of “I need to do more of this...” that must be let go of. 

 

I struggle with this, too. It’s not an easy thing. But the moments in which I feel the most clear, free and expansive is when I am not trying to do anything, I’m just aware and open, in the moment.  Our true nature is already here, now. 

 

I practice yoga and tai chi to help myself be healthy and aware of my body. But it’s easy to fall into the thoughts of “I’m  achieving some spiritual goal with the practices”, when in reality I am just creating some additional thing I need to do to reach a certain state of mind.

 

Dzogchen is good at teaching us that whatever state of mind we are in (even if that’s caught up and confused) is still our natural state, and there’s nothing that needs to be done to fix or medicate it. Simply by accepting this, allows us to come back to our center. 

 

Anyways, I hope I’m not a total buzzkill with my post. It’s something I struggle with too.  It’s ok to do new practices, but important I think to know they won’t bring us anywhere closer to ourselves - we are already here. :)

 

While I agree with most of what you have described, I feel it depends entirely on where a person is.  The Dzogchen teaching is wise, but I feel it may not be the right answer to everyone universally.

 

This is why in Kashmir Shaivisim they propose 3 paths depending on where a person is and how much they can absorb.  There is also a fourth way in KS that is similar to what you described from Dzogchen that transcends all the others.  But, it is not a path advocated for everyone.

 

The first path sambhavopaya in KS involves the shaktipat or anugraha from a divine being, which lifts an aspirant to the state of higher clarity shared by the divine.  Only those who are ready succeed only by this.  As per the sutra, 'Udayamo Bhairava:', the aspirant gets lifted to the state of the master in one rising scoop.  The second path is the sakthopaya, those who are not able to reach that state in one push or thrust, go through this path.  In addition to the divine help, this path starts an energetic transformation in the aspirant that eventually lifts them to the clarity or the state of the master.  Not everyone succeed in this path also.  Those who do not succeed in this path, go through the 3rd or final method, the anavopaya. This method in addition to divine help & possible energetic transformations, involves practices like yoga, pranayama and meditation practices to make an aspirant ready for the 2 higher paths.

 

In this philosophy, no one solution works universally for everyone.  What is the perfect solution for one can possibly be a hurdle to another.  This is what I like about this philosophy, the practical acceptance that different people need different things that can work or help them depending on where they are.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/8/2019 at 1:45 PM, S1va said:

 

While I agree with most of what you have described, I feel it depends entirely on where a person is.  The Dzogchen teaching is wise, but I feel it may not be the right answer to everyone universally.

 

This is why in Kashmir Shaivisim they propose 3 paths depending on where a person is and how much they can absorb.  There is also a fourth way in KS that is similar to what you described from Dzogchen that transcends all the others.  But, it is not a path advocated for everyone.

 

The first path sambhavopaya in KS involves the shaktipat or anugraha from a divine being, which lifts an aspirant to the state of higher clarity shared by the divine.  Only those who are ready succeed only by this.  As per the sutra, 'Udayamo Bhairava:', the aspirant gets lifted to the state of the master in one rising scoop.  The second path is the sakthopaya, those who are not able to reach that state in one push or thrust, go through this path.  In addition to the divine help, this path starts an energetic transformation in the aspirant that eventually lifts them to the clarity or the state of the master.  Not everyone succeed in this path also.  Those who do not succeed in this path, go through the 3rd or final method, the anavopaya. This method in addition to divine help & possible energetic transformations, involves practices like yoga, pranayama and meditation practices to make an aspirant ready for the 2 higher paths.

 

In this philosophy, no one solution works universally for everyone.  What is the perfect solution for one can possibly be a hurdle to another.  This is what I like about this philosophy, the practical acceptance that different people need different things that can work or help them depending on where they are.

 

Very good point. Thank you for sharing about KS. I was more sharing from my own point of view, and what I’ve found has helped me. But your right, what worked for me may not work for someone else. :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you @FaXin, @Tom and @S1va for your valuable input. I am going through what you have said intuitively and trying to see what works best for me.


Experimenting with dzogchen and mindfulness for now. It has opened up some breathing space for me. Will update you guys when I have less on my plate and new stuff to share. :)

<3

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey @Billa I wanted to post a follow up to this...

 

The last couple weeks I've started practicing Tai chi again, and I've noticed a few things I wanted to share.  I feel like my original post was dismissive of all practices, and something about it bothered me.  While I do think there is wisdom and truth in needing to let go of practices, sometimes we learn more by doing those practices and following it to it's natural destination.

 

Short history: I've practiced Taijiquan on and off for about 20 years.  I've never been a serious student, but I've been serious enough where I've studied with a few high quality teachers, read books and practiced.  It was a hobby I enjoyed.

 

So I picked it back up a couple weeks ago. 

 

From time to time I will practice the form, just for the fun of it.  The last time however, I felt a great draw to it.  The energy was flowing very strongly, and I felt very present, and in the moment.  It seems the spark was reignited, and I decided to practice again.  It quickly became a priority of mine.  I dug out a few of my old books and DVDs, and started from the ground up, correcting my form and learning new things.

 

The benefits are there.  I've definitely been more mindful and in the present moment.  I've felt clearer proprioception (the awareness of my surroundings). I've also slept better and feel I have physically more energy.  I'm also in my mid 30's, so any exercise would benefit me for the future.  I won't go into the other health benefits of Tai chi, as they are well documented everywhere.  Suffice it to say they appeared on Day 1.

 

Now comes the "drawback"... the practice has been hitting my ego.  There's a saying in Taijiquan that you "play Taijiquan" -  you're supposed to have fun with it, and not take yourself too seriously.  Well I must've forgot that.  I immediately was questioning my technique and structure.  I emailed my old teachers and asked them a few questions, even looked into taking some classes.  After a few days, it seemed I had taken on the burden and baggage of a "new practice" - even though I've been at it for years.  Maybe that's what made me take breaks in the past.

 

What was really happening is my ego was being "hit".  I noticed that thoughts of "my kua should be open" - which noticing and correcting is part of the practice - turned into "My kua isn't open, maybe I'm doing this wrong.  I should contact my old teacher.  Maybe I shouldn't even do this anymore.  Could another art be better?"  Feelings of self worth, attachment to my self.  There's having fun with a hobby, and letting it "get to you."  I quickly found my clarity diminishing.  I knew I was getting caught on stuff.

 

Here's the catch though - without the Taijiquan practice to highlight this, I wouldn't have the opportunity to clear it.  So for a while I was blaming the practice itself - but in reality, it's just how I am reacting to the practice.  And in a way, it is helping me clear my own ego crap.  I do plan on continuing to "play tai chi" and seeing what happens with it.  Bottom line, and most important - I enjoy it, it's fun... and that's why I do it.  I just have to remind myself that. :)

 

Cheers!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2019 at 5:56 AM, FaXin said:

Hey @Billa I wanted to post a follow up to this...

 

The last couple weeks I've started practicing Tai chi again, and I've noticed a few things I wanted to share.  I feel like my original post was dismissive of all practices, and something about it bothered me.  While I do think there is wisdom and truth in needing to let go of practices, sometimes we learn more by doing those practices and following it to it's natural destination.

 

Short history: I've practiced Taijiquan on and off for about 20 years.  I've never been a serious student, but I've been serious enough where I've studied with a few high quality teachers, read books and practiced.  It was a hobby I enjoyed.

 

So I picked it back up a couple weeks ago. 

 

From time to time I will practice the form, just for the fun of it.  The last time however, I felt a great draw to it.  The energy was flowing very strongly, and I felt very present, and in the moment.  It seems the spark was reignited, and I decided to practice again.  It quickly became a priority of mine.  I dug out a few of my old books and DVDs, and started from the ground up, correcting my form and learning new things.

 

The benefits are there.  I've definitely been more mindful and in the present moment.  I've felt clearer proprioception (the awareness of my surroundings). I've also slept better and feel I have physically more energy.  I'm also in my mid 30's, so any exercise would benefit me for the future.  I won't go into the other health benefits of Tai chi, as they are well documented everywhere.  Suffice it to say they appeared on Day 1.

 

Now comes the "drawback"... the practice has been hitting my ego.  There's a saying in Taijiquan that you "play Taijiquan" -  you're supposed to have fun with it, and not take yourself too seriously.  Well I must've forgot that.  I immediately was questioning my technique and structure.  I emailed my old teachers and asked them a few questions, even looked into taking some classes.  After a few days, it seemed I had taken on the burden and baggage of a "new practice" - even though I've been at it for years.  Maybe that's what made me take breaks in the past.

 

What was really happening is my ego was being "hit".  I noticed that thoughts of "my kua should be open" - which noticing and correcting is part of the practice - turned into "My kua isn't open, maybe I'm doing this wrong.  I should contact my old teacher.  Maybe I shouldn't even do this anymore.  Could another art be better?"  Feelings of self worth, attachment to my self.  There's having fun with a hobby, and letting it "get to you."  I quickly found my clarity diminishing.  I knew I was getting caught on stuff.

 

Here's the catch though - without the Taijiquan practice to highlight this, I wouldn't have the opportunity to clear it.  So for a while I was blaming the practice itself - but in reality, it's just how I am reacting to the practice.  And in a way, it is helping me clear my own ego crap.  I do plan on continuing to "play tai chi" and seeing what happens with it.  Bottom line, and most important - I enjoy it, it's fun... and that's why I do it.  I just have to remind myself that. :)

 

Cheers!

 

Thanks for the detailed post @FaXin!   :)

However, your initial post seems more relevant at this point. Experimenting with Dzogchen, I'm learning that just letting go and residing is the path of least resistance for me at the moment.

Interesting that you've looked at your Tai chi practice as play. Need to give that approach a shot perhaps. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...